Welcome to my blog, where I take pleasure in words and pictures, be they my own or those of others. I'm a creative individual, and the crafty side I explore on my 'other blog', Picking Up The Threads, which I hope you'll visit too. I'm sure you understand that I have sole copyright of my original work and any of my contributions, so please ask if you want to use them. A polite request is rarely refused. So, as they used to say on the BBC's 'Listen With Mother' radio programme, many years ago: "Are you sitting comfortably? Then we'll begin."

Sunday, 25 March 2012

Lost Cause



Image Duane Michals



When I saw Tess's photo prompt for the week's 'The Mag' I immediately thought of 'The Lady of Shallot' by Tennyson. I have unashamedly tried to incorporate some of his wonderful words  into my poem. Think of it as an homage, and if you want to have fun with this click here to read Tennyson's immortal words and see which ones I stole (shared).




She stood by the window to borrow its light, 
not to look out into the world beyond,
but to see what she'd left behind;
a past as darkly shadowed as the purple night,
so that she dare not look over her shoulder,
at the flickering images of her memory.
Instead, she peered uncertainly at the glass,
straining to see a glimmer of truth materialise.
Imprisoned by the four grey walls of her grief,
she reflected on the illusion of love,  
the distorted mirroring of another life;
A woman who cared too much and was cursed.
She tried to concentrate on the present,
desperately urging her mind to see the future, 
but she was already losing her grip;
the web of deceit was unravelling,
the cracks were beginning to appear.
© Marilyn Brindley




24 comments:

  1. not to look out into the world beyond,
    but to see what she'd left behind

    Looking back is seldom a good idea...

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  2. Oh, you have captured the descent into madness very well! Nice rhyming work too!

    I love Loreena McKennitt - have every one of her albums.

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    1. She was new to me Kat, but I have decided I like her voice and the Celtic feel to this piece.

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  3. So terrific to think of the Lady of Shallot. You've taken the prompt in a wonderful direction. K.

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  4. A great capture in this. Lots of depth of emotions. Regret, sadness and longing. A whole range of really deep emotions which made for a lovely read. :)

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  5. Your theft is our pleasure...great job

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  6. A great homage, Nell! A beautiful treatment!

    Hank

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  7. tried to concentrate on the present reminds me of the power of now

    mirrored

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  8. I like it. It doesn't hurt to glance back...just don't stare.

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  9. The mirrored truth; our joy and our terror.
    rel

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  10. Interesting - you quote Tennyson and I quote Burns...

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  11. What a unique perspective and what a wonderful idea, to borrow words and create something new and meaningful from them. I am reminded of how the stones from old buildings are built into the framework of newer ones enabling change whilst preserving continuity.

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    1. I like that analogy, I must remember to use it next time I pinch some words from a famous bard!

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  12. Lovely... I especially like-

    Imprisoned by the four grey walls of her grief,
    she reflected on the illusion of love,
    the distorted mirroring of another life

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  13. My goodness, Nell, I got behind! You have posted two beautiful posts since last week. Your poem and that video are lovely, as well is the rose stamp post. Hope you are having a wonderful week!

    Kathy M.

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  14. Well done with Tennyson's Lady. Most enjoyable.

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  15. That really is a fitting poem. If every theft ended like this I'd encourage it! lol.....and a video to boot! Hadn't heard this song for years - nice to be refreshed!

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  16. Very well written. I specially like:

    she reflected on the illusion of love,
    the distorted mirroring of another life;
    A woman who cared too much and was cursed.

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  17. A lovely poem. I was motivated by it to look for Tennyson's sources, because it had a similar use of a mirrror to that of Perseus, when he couldn't look directly at Medusa without turning to stone. In that case, of course, it wasn't the protagonist who dies!

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  18. Excellent write Little Nell!

    Anna :o]

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  19. Ah, that time when the forward is gray and the past is full and colorful. Nice work!

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